The 6 Breakfast Foods All Parents Should Avoid.

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Steer clear now, or pay the price later.

We get it, as parenting duties increase the need for so-called “convenience foods” goes up as well. But while the faster, easier to prep foods are looking more tempting, the amount of time you’re able to commit to the gym is probably crashing. With less exercise comes a slower metabolism.

Avoid these 6 foods, or Dad-bod (and whatever is the kind way of explaining the Mom equivalent) is coming faster than you think!

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1. Pancakes

This shouldn’t come as much of a surprise as they’re literally “cakes” that were made in a pan. Brand-name syrup is basically watered-down icing. Worst of all, for as calorie rich and sweet as they are, because they’re low-fiber, you can expect to be hungry again within an hour or so.

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2. Muffins

Calling muffins “cupcakes in disguise” is a little extreme as cupcakes are almost completely made of sugar. But at 450 calories on average, it’s entirely possible that a store bought blueberry muffin has more calories than a store bought cupcake (298 calories on average). And don’t be fooled by the berries and nuts, that muffin is low on nutritional value too. 1

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3. Processed Fruit Juice

Check the label, if you see any hint of added sugars and preservatives, run. Even the natural stuff is best served in moderation. The problem is that the juice has just as much sugar as the fruit it came from, but all of the dietary fiber has been stripped away. Whenever possible, pick whole fruits over juice for a healthy dose of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. 2

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4. Breakfast bars

At first glance, cereal bars, also known as breakfast bars, are easy to mistake for healthy breakfast options. In reality, many of them are nutritional nightmares. Most cereal bars are high in calories, sugar, and unhealthy saturated fat and salt, which can be especially detrimental. Even worse, if your thinking of sharing the version of these bars you child is eating, a 2013 study reports that children’s ‘healthy’ foods, such as yogurts and cereal bars are higher in fat, sugar, and salt than those marketed to the general population.

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5. Instant oatmeal

You might think instant oatmeal is just a faster version of it’s nutritious, but fairly slow forebearer. You’d be wrong. In spite of its old-timey picture of William Penn on the box, Quaker Oats Instant Oatmeal, for example, has 14 grams of sugar per serving in it’s Maple & Brown Sugar variety. That’s about a third of the sugar in a full-force can of Coke, in just over half the volume. Want to do right by your changing body? Take the time to boil the oats the original way.

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6. Kids’ Breakfast Cereal

If you’ve allowed it into your house (and we hope you haven’t) this is going to be tempting. Keep in mind that your body does more “storing” than the kids the ad execs are targeting with these terrible products and no amount of vitamins and minerals highlighted on the front of the box, changes the grams of sugar and processed ingredients per serving you’ll find on the back.

So what’s left for the parent looking to set the day up right? There’s lots actually…

alt Oatmeal - The real stuff.

Eggs - Scrambled, hard boiled or fried.

Bagels - Try to keep them to a reasonable size and consider topping with cream cheese, tomatoes, and cucumber.

Yogurt - Unflavored and with berries. Whole fruits.

Breads - Whole grains are the best.

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  1. Source: Herts.ac.uk

  2. Source: Harvard.edu

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